656 Fort Washington Avenue, Inwood, 1926

656 Fort Washington Avenue, Inwood, 1926

You don't see many homes like this in Manhattan anymore. When this photo was taken, on March 17, 1926, this Victorian-era home had already seen better days. The location now hosts a 6 storey apartment building across the street from tennis and basketball courts of a public school.

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Mitchell the Tailor, Broadway and 40th Street, 1915

Mitchell the Tailor, Broadway and 40th Street, 1915

This photograph, taken on October 3, 1915, shows the northwest corner of Broadway and West 40th Street. The picture focuses on the shop of Mitchell the Tailor (from Boston), whose store was located at 1431 Broadway. Also included in the photo are the Green Cars, New York City sightseeing tours. A Nygard store occupies the location now, and an entrance to the subway is around the corner.

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Broadway and 45th Street, 1915

Broadway and 45th Street, 1915

In this black and white photograph from September 26, 1915, we see the Loews New York theater at 45th and Broadway. The signs boast continuous performance from 11:00 AM to 11:00 PM. Today's showing was Trilby, released on September 20, the drama, set in England and France, was filmed in Fort Lee, NJ. The theater was demolished in 1935, but in 20 years of operation reportedly sold 50 million tickets.

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Fifth Avenue Hotel, circa 1875

Fifth Avenue Hotel, circa 1875

The Fifth Avenue Hotel, seen in this photo from the 1870s, was a luxury accomodation built in the late 1850s. At the time of this photograph, Ulysses S. Grant had recently used the hotel as the launch point for his Presidential campaign. The location at 200 Fifth Avenue is diagonally across from the eventual site of the Flatiron Building. However, the two buildings did not coexist for long, since the Fifth Avenue Hotel was demolished in 1908 not long after the Flatiron was constructed. The site is now probably best known as the location of Eataly.

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NYFD Engine No. 72, East 12th Street, c. 1910

Fire Company and Engine No. 72, East 12th Street, c. 1910

In this black and white photograph, taken around 1910, we see the entire company of Engine 72, located at 22 East 12th Street, at the site of what is now Cinema Village. Manhattan Engine 72 was organized and disbanded several times between July 1, 1900 and May 1, 1918, when it was permanently disbanded. This photo shows 11 of New York's Bravest standing atop their High Pressure engine.

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George Washington Bridge, Opening Day, October 25, 1931

George Washington Bridge, Opening Day, October 25, 1931

The George Washington Bridge was dedicated on October 24, 1931 and opened to traffic the following day, the date of this black and white photograph. Here we see Governor of New York State, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, crossing the bridge with his motorcade. The span between its two towers, the main span, is over 3500 ft., making the GWB the longest main span bridge in the world at the time of this picture.

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Prow and the Shadow of the Flatiron Building, 1902

Prow and the Shadow of the Flatiron Building, 1902

This is a seldom seen view of one of New York City's most famous buildings, the Flatiron Building. In this black and white photograph taken in 1902, the Fuller Building (as it was then known) was still under construction. Here the photographer stands on an upper floor of the nearly complete building and aims his camera down. From above, you can see horsecarts, streetcars, and pedestrians, but precious few by contemporary standards.

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Manhattan Bridge Under Construction, March 1909

Manhattan Bridge Under Construction, 1909

Construction on the Manhattan Bridge began in 1901, and it opened to the public on December 31, 1909.  In this black and white photo, taken from Main Street, in Brooklyn, on March 23, 1909, we see it nearing completion. Both towers are up and the span between them is under way.  The Manhattan Bridge was the last of the bridges connecting the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn.

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Battery Place, Iron Steamboat Company Ferry Terminal, 1914

Battery Place, Iron Steamboat Company Ferry Terminal, 1914

Sure, you could get to the beach by subway, but on this day at the end of July in 1914, you could take the Ferry from Lower Manhattan to Coney Island or Rockaway Beach. The Iron Steamboat Company operated summer ferry service to a number of seaside locations until the close of the season in 1932. In 1914, you could get a ride to Steeplechase Pier and spend the day at the amusement park or the beach.

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Seventh Avenue and West 31st Street, 1922

Seventh Avenue and West 31st Street, 1922

In this black and white photograph from 1922, we see Pennsylvania Station from the corner of 7th Avenue and W. 31st Street. Several cars and a street car are going past its columned facade. This monument to transportation, architected by the firm of McKim, Mead & White, would be torn down in 1963. At the time of this photo passenger volume had yet to reach its peak. The streets themselves look empty compared to today.

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