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Herald Square with Streetcars and the Sixth Avenue Elevated Train, 1899

Herald Square with Streetcars and the Sixth Avenue Elevated Train, 1899

Herald Square, pictured here in 1899, was named after the New York Herald, the largest circulation newspaper of the time. The New York Herald Building was designed by McKim, Mead & White, and constructed in 1895. Herald Square could be called the ancestor of Times Square as the hub of New York City life. At the intersection of Sixth Avenue, Broadway, and 34th Street, with access to the Sixth Avenue Elevated Train and numerous streetcars, it was certainly a pre-eminent crossroads, well-trafficked enough to entice Macy's to open their flagship store there in 1907.

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Seventh Avenue and West 30th Street, c. 1920

Seventh Avenue and West 30th Street, c. 1920

Looking north from West 30th Street along Seventh Avenue one can see two of the famed works of the architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, Pennsylvania Station and the Hotel Pennsylvania. The former opened in 1910 and was demolished in 1963, while the latter opened in 1919 and is still operating. The Hotel Pennsylvania  has been in danger of demolition since the 1990s, having been unable to secure, as of 2011, landmark status.

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Southwest Overview of Pennsylvania Station, 1910

Southwest Overview of Pennsylvania Station, 1910

In 1910, New York City opened its Temple of Transportation. In this photograph, taken shortly after the opening of Pennsylvania Station, we can see McKim, Mead & White's neo-classical monument in all its glory. Covering more than 7 acres, Penn Station was the largest indoor space in New York City and one of the largest public spaces in the world.

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