Brooklyn

Brooklyn Navy Yard Operating Room, 1908

Brooklyn Navy Yard Operating Room, 1908
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Fans Behind the Yankee Dugout Watch the 1956 World Series at Ebbets Field

Fans Behind the Yankee Dugout Watch the 1956 World Series at Ebbets Field

The first two games and the last two games of the 1956 World Series, between the arch-rivals the New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers, were played at Ebbets Field. The Bums from Brooklyn were the defending World Champions, making this a very intense series. Looking into this photograph, you can almost feel the tension of the fans.  They didn't know it then, but this would be the last World Series ever played in the beloved Ebbets Field.

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NBC Camera Broadcasts 1956 World Series from Ebbets Field

NBC Camera Broadcasts 1956 World Series from Ebbets Field

The NBC camera crew and Brooklyn Dodger fans look on intently at the 1956 World Series.  The 1956 World Series was a rematch of the two great New York rivals, the New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers.  In 1955, the Dodgers took it -- their first championship in the history of the franchise.  In this series, the Yanks reclaimed their title, beating the Bums in seven games.  This black and white picture, although depicting none of the game, captures all the intensity of the old time rivalry and loyalty of the fans.

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1953 Brooklyn Dodgers Team Photo

1953 Brooklyn Dodgers Team Photo

This black and white portrait of the 1953 Brooklyn Dodgers includes quite a few legends. Among them are Jackie Robinson, Roy Campanella, Pee Wee Reese, Duke Snider, Gil Hodges, Ralph Branca, and quite a few other notables. Dem Bums took the National League pennant for the second year in a row, but again lost the World Series to their arch-rivals, the New York Yankees.

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Ebbets Field, Brooklyn, 1950

Ebbets Field, Brooklyn, 1950

This photo shows the field, stands, and scoreboard of the great Ebbets Field, home of the Brooklyn Dodgers from 1912 through 1957.  Here we can see a few men doing field maintenance.  No baseball game is in progress.  In the background are a number of billboards, which are clearly focused on men's products -- Bulova watches, Van Heusen shirts, Botany ties, GEM razor blades, and Esquire boot polish.  The scoreboard itself if sponsored by Schaefer beer, "the one beer to have when you're having more than one."

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Delancey and Clinton Street Traffic Jam, 1923

Delancy and Clinton Street Traffic Jam, 1923

Imagine coming off the Williamsburg Bridge into this mess at Delancey and Clinton Streets on the Lower East Side.  It's enough to send you right back to Brooklyn.  The traffic jam depicted in this 1923 Black and White photo shows a snarl up of cars, trolleys, and the Third Avenue Rail line.  Even by today's standards this is vehicular congestion of epic proportions.

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Ebbets Field Rotunda Entrance, 1950

Ebbets Field Rotunda Entrance, 1950

Charlie Ebbets acquired adjacent parcels of land in Flatbush over several years until he had enough space to build a stadium. Construction of Ebbets field began in 1912, and the Brooklyn Dodgers played their first exhibition game in Ebbets Field against rivals the New York Yankees on April 5, 1913. The stadium was the home of the Dodgers until their move to L.A. at the end of the 1957 season. At the time of this photo, the Dodgers were in the midst of a series of good years. Although they didn't win the pennant in 1950, they did in 1947, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1955, and 1956.

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Brooklyn Bridge and Lower Manhattan Skyline at Dusk, 1956

Brooklyn Bridge and Lower Manhattan Skyline at Dusk, 1956

Sun sets over New York City, and the city begins to glow with its own light. The spires of the Lower Manhattan skyscrapers, including the Cities Services Building and the Woolworth Building, can be seen beyond the Brooklyn Tower of the Brooklyn Bridge. The skyline of today would not be extremely different. Most notable, perhaps, is the absence of lights coming from the South Street Seaport, which in 1956 was not a tourist destination, but a working fish market.

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