Manhattan

New York Central Railroad Train on Eleventh Avenue, 1929

New York Central Railroad Train on Eleventh Avenue, 1929

Before the West Side Improvement Project created the High Line, trains ran down Tenth and Eleventh Avenue. Here a New York Central Freight Train heads south on Eleventh. A flagman, or West Side Cowboy, should be preceding the train, but in this shot is out of the frame. The train is passing the George Kern building. Kern was a packing, wholesale, and retail distributor of pork and beef products, which was bought by Adolf Gobel, Inc., in 1927 for $10 million.

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Midtown Manhattan Overview from West 31st Street, c. 1930

Midtown Manhattan Overview from West 31st Street, c. 1930

In this black and white photo from the early 1930s, the camera looks northwest from West 31st Street, taking in the roof of Penn Station and the high-rises that have grown up around it.

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Aerial View of Midtown Spires, c. 1950

Aerial View of Midtown Spires, c. 1950

In this aerial black and white photo from about 1950, we see the spires of Midtown East, including the Helmsley Building and the Chrysler Building. The midcentury haze obscures southern manhattan and Queen, giving the sense that the world beyond Midtown Manhattan ceases to to exist.

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Greenwich and Fulton Streets, 1914

Greenwich and Fulton Streets, 1914

In this black and white photograph, taken in 1914, we see a man walking beneath the elevated train line at the intersection of Greenwich and Fulton Streets in Lower Manhattan. There's a lot of detail in this old picture, from the guy getting a nickel shoe shine on the left to the storefronts across the street. But perhaps the most intersesting thing about this photograph is that Greenwich and Fulton Streets no longer intersect. Their union was broken in the 1960s when the designers of the World Trade Center carved out a Super-Block in Lower Manhattan.

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The Flatiron Building after a Snow Storm, 1906

The Flatiron Building after a Snow Storm, 1906

In this view south from East 26th Street and Fifth Avenue, the Flatiron Building looks like it is plowing through the snow. It looks like a substantial amount of fresh snow has blanketed the city, all of which has been shoveled by hand. The streets are as clear as they are likely to get until the hooves of the horses tramp it into slush. But luckily for us, some anonymous photographer captured the clean beauty of this moment forever.

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Censored in Times Square, 1948

Censored in Times Square, 1948
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Aerial Overview of the Statue of Liberty and Upper New York Bay, 1956

Aerial Overview of the Statue of Liberty and Upper New York Bay, 1956

The Statue of Liberty stands at the entrance to New York Harbor, welcoming all to the land of liberty. Looking past her, you can see a string of barges heading into the harbor and an Ocean Liner heading out. Beyond them are the Lower Manhattan Skyline and the East River bridges. The golden age of transatlantic sailing  was coming to an end by this time, and the era of jet travel was about to begin.

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Aerial Overview of the Empire State Building, 1964

Aerial Overview of the Empire State Building, 1964

The Empire State Building is no less impressive when seen from above than from below. In this aerial photograph, taken in 1964, we can see the Art Deco masterpiece in all its glory. It dominates the midtown skyline, stabbing upward into the sky, defiantly daring someone to build a taller building. It would be nearly a decade before anyone would.

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The San Remo Apartments, seen from Central Park, 1932

The San Remo Apartments, seen from Central Park, 1932

The San Remo Apartment building, with its twin tower construction, epitomizes Upper West Side luxury. Construction began in 1929 and completed shortly before this photograph was taken in 1932. Many of the larger apartments had to be subdivided during the Great Depression to make them more affordable to renters. Since then, the New York real estate market has changed dramatically, and now the San Remo is amongst the most expensive locations in Manhattan, housing many wealthy business tycoons and celebrities.

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