Minerva

New York Herald Building, West 35th Street and Sixth Avenue, c. 1895

New York Herald Building, West 35th Street and Sixth Avenue, c. 1895

This portrait of the New York Herald Building was taken around 1895 by the H. N. Tiemann Co.  Herald Square was named for the New York Herald, much the same as Times Square was named for rival newspaper, The New York Times.  In this photograph, we can see atop the Herald Building the statue of Minerva, the Roman goddess of wisdom, and her owls. A bell and two bellringers stand just below Minerva, ready to toll the hour.

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Workers atop Grand Central Terminal, 1950

Workers atop Grand Central Terminal, 1950

View east toward workers painting the flagpole on Grand Central Terminal.  The collossal clock and statue of "Transportation" by French artist Jules-Alexis Coutan are in the background. On the statue Mercury is flanked by Minerva and Hercules. Minerva, the goddess of wisdom, represents the thought and planning put into this building, while Mercury, the god of speed, represents both the speed of commerce and, of course, the speed of trains, and Hercules represents the strength of the men who built GCT.  The flagpole has since been removed.

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