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Sightseeing Bus in front of Flatiron Building, 1910

Sightseeing Bus in front of Flatiron Building, 1910

New York City has always attracted tourists. Here a busload of them prepare to see the sights, and there's no better place to begin than the Flatiron Building, which had only opened a few years before, in 1902. The official name of the Flatiron is the Fuller Building,   which is inscribed on the metal gates below the arch.

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Pennsylvania Station at Night, c. 1922

Pennsylvania Station at Night, c. 1922

What have we lost? Prior to the establishment of the Landmarks Commission, many wonderful buildings were torn down in the name of progress. Perhaps none was a greater loss than the original Penn Station. In this exterior night shot, it looks a worthy successor to the Roman monuments it was meant to evoke.

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The Boulevard on a Rainy Day, c. 1899

The Boulevard on a Rainy Day, c. 1899

North of Columbus Circle, Broadway was known as The Boulevard, until the name was officially changed around the time of this photograph. Hanging above the roadway is a sign that doesn't apply in the context of contemporary New York City. It reads, "Pleasure Traffic Keep Over to the Left. Business Traffic Keep Over to the Curb."

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Grand Central Station, 1905

Grand Central Station, 1905

There have been three train stations bearing the name Grand Central in New York City. This photo shows the second structure, Grand Central Station, which only existed in this form for about a decade. Grand Central Station replaced Grand Central Depot in an effort to relieve congestion and improve safety. A catastrophic train collision in 1902 impelled further improvement, and Grand Central Station was torn down in stages and replaced by Grand Central Terminal completely by 1913.

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