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Memorial Day in the Bronx, circa 1890

Memorial Day in the Bronx, circa 1890

Memorial Day began in both the North and the South, following the Civil War, as a day to honor soldiers who had died in military service. Initially, the holiday was called Decoration Day, after the practice of decorating the graves of the fallen soldiers, but in 1882, not long before this photograph was taken, the name of the holiday was changed to Memorial Day. In this picture, we see the remaining members of Union Regiment 73 taking part in a Memorial Day Parade on Tremont Avenue in the Bronx.

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The Boulevard on a Rainy Day, c. 1899

The Boulevard on a Rainy Day, c. 1899

North of Columbus Circle, Broadway was known as The Boulevard, until the name was officially changed around the time of this photograph. Hanging above the roadway is a sign that doesn't apply in the context of contemporary New York City. It reads, "Pleasure Traffic Keep Over to the Left. Business Traffic Keep Over to the Curb."

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World Trade Center Under Construction, February 27, 1970

World Trade Center Under Construction, February 27, 1970

In this black and white picture taken by photographer Mal Gurian on February 27, 1970, construction of the north tower of the World Trade Center is substantially under way. The south tower in the foreground has made significant progress, but is several month behind its sister tower.

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Carl Schurz Park and Gracie Mansion, 1940

Carl Schurz Park and Gracie Mansion, 1940

A light dusting of snow has fallen on Carl Schurz Park. Gracie Mansion overlooks Hell Gate from the north end of the park. The mayor did not reside here in 1940. At this point the mansion was simply a historic house, which most recently had been the Museum of City of New York. Only in 1942, at the urging of Robert Moses, did Mayor Fiorello La Guardia appropriate the house as the mayoral residence.

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Washington Square Arch, 1905

Washington Square Arch, 1905

The Washington Square Arch was erected to commemorate the centennial of George Washington's inauguration. This is not that arch. This arch was erected in 1892 to replace the temporary plaster and wooden structure which spanned Fifth Avenue just north of the park. In this photo, we are looking at the north face of the permanent marble arch designed by Stanford White. Absent are the two statues of George Washington, which were added in 1918.

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