Street

Amsterdam Avenue and West 207th Street, 1926

Amsterdam Avenue and West 207th Street, 1926

The streets are bustling in Inwood on this beautiful day in 1926.  Looking west toward Post Avenue and beyond, one can see the Corn Exchange Bank, several dance halls, a Chop Suey restaruant, and the Dyckman Theater.  The theater was a 1,700 seat movie palace that opened in 1913 and ultimately became part of the Loews chain.  This neighborhood is the northernmost in the island of Manhattan, and it is believed to be the location where Peter Minuit bought the island from the Lenape Indians.

$35.00

Choose a print size

Flatiron Building Seen from 26th Street, 1907

Flatiron Building Seen from 26th Street, 1907

The Flatiron District doesn't look terribly different today, with the iconic Flatiron Building cutting like a ship's prow through the combined traffic of Fifth Avenue and Broadway. It's the nature of the traffic that's changed. Here we see horses, carriages, and streetcars, rather than the cars, taxis, and buses of today. Oh, and maybe there are a few more tall buildings. But really, with the Flatiron in view, who notices them?

$35.00

Choose a print size

Depression Era Apple Seller at Broadway and W. 32 Street, 1930

Depression Era Apple Seller at Broadway and W. 32 Street, c. 1930

In 1930, the International Apple Shippers Association, overstocked on fruit, came up with short term solution for the unemployed. They sold them apples at a greatly reduced rate on credit. By November, there were 6,000 apple sellers in New York City alone. This remedy only worked while the overstock of fruit lasted, and by the end of 1931 the apple sellers were all gone. Here we see a young woman buying an apple from an unemployed man at Greeley Square. The Sixth Avenue Elevated Station can be see in the background.

$35.00

Choose a print size

New York Herald Building, West 35th Street and Sixth Avenue, c. 1895

New York Herald Building, West 35th Street and Sixth Avenue, c. 1895

This portrait of the New York Herald Building was taken around 1895 by the H. N. Tiemann Co.  Herald Square was named for the New York Herald, much the same as Times Square was named for rival newspaper, The New York Times.  In this photograph, we can see atop the Herald Building the statue of Minerva, the Roman goddess of wisdom, and her owls. A bell and two bellringers stand just below Minerva, ready to toll the hour.

$35.00

Choose a print size

Kids Cool Off in a Sprinkler on the Lower East Side, 1923

Kids Cool Off in a Sprinkler on the Lower East Side, 1923

Some things never change. One of the joys of childhood is running through a sprinkler in summer. For most this probably conjures images of suburban lawns, but as this photo attests city kids did it, too. On a hot summer day in 1923 on the Lower East Side, these kids cooled off by running in the street under a sprinkler hooked up to a fire hydrant.

$35.00

Choose a print size

Grand and Thompson Streets, 1927

Grand and Thompson Streets, 1927

Was there ever a time when New York City was not under construction? Here, at the corner of Thompson and Grand in November, 1927, construction is business as usual. The photographer looks east, past construction on either side of the street, toward the West Broadway and the Grand Street Station of the Sixth Avenue Elevated Train, which ceased running in 1938. It was replaced by the IND line, which is probably what is being built in this photograph.

$35.00

Choose a print size

Seventh Avenue and West 29th Street, 1915

Seventh Avenue and West 29th Street, 1915

Streetcars rumble down Seventh Avenue, past horse-drawn carts and seemingly all male pedestrians.  Looking a couple of blocks north, on the west side of the street, one can see the columns of the Pennsylvania Station, which opened in 1910. The buildings look like a mixture of street-level store fronts and upper story residences.

$35.00

Choose a print size

West Side Cowboy, circa 1930

West Side Cowboy, circa 1930

The West Side Cowboy was a common sight on Tenth Avenue for over 80 years. By law, a man on horseback, waving a red flag, had to precede each train that ran down the avenue. Still, so many accidents occurred that Tenth Avenue became known as Death Avenue. In 1929, the city, the state, and the New York Central Railroad agreed on the West Side Improvement Project, which resulted in the creation of the High Line and the elimination of the street level tracks and the flagman on horseback. Here we see the flagman on Tenth Avenue and West 28th Street, alongside Chelsea Park.

$35.00

Choose a print size

Oktoberfest circa 1947 on East 86th Street

Oktoberfest circa 1947 on East 86th Street

Germantown doesn't exist anymore. Even Yorkville is an unfamiliar term to present-day Upper East Siders. But until as recently as the 1990s, East 86th Street hosted many German restaurants, butcher shops, and pastry shops, and at the time of this photograph in the late 1940s, East 86th Street was known as the German Broadway. Nowadays, Oktoberfest is an excuse for Yuppies to go on a pub crawl and puke in the street, but as this photo attests, the finer elements of the tradition have been lost.

$35.00

Choose a print size

Third Avenue Elevated Station at East 42nd Street, 1915

Third Avenue Elevated Station at East 42nd Street, 1915

This particular station on the Third Avenue Elevated line opened for business in 1878 and remained open until the main line of the Third Avenue El was shut down in 1955. In this shot, taken on March 5, 1915, we look north along the track from East 41st Street toward the platforms at 42nd Street with a southbound local in the distance.

$35.00

Choose a print size

Syndicate content