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Amsterdam Avenue and West 125th Street, 1927

Amsterdam Avenue and West 125th Street, 1927

If it weren't for the date inscribed on the negative, one would never know this was a fall day in 1927. Neither the clothing nor the very few trees give anything away. Here the photographer shoots south along Amsterdam towards Columbia University. Nowadays, you'd see the bridge across Amsterdam between the Main Campus and the East Campus where the Law and SIPA buildings are located. In 1927 neither the buildings nor the bridge had been built yet.

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Sixth Avenue and West 52nd Street, 1937

Sixth Avenue and West 52nd Street, 1937

You're looking north from very near the center of the world, in 1937.  The Rockefeller Center complex, behind you on your right, was not entirely complete, although Radio City Music Hall had been open for about five years at the time this photo was taken.  The Sixth Avenue Elevated Line, overhead, would run for another year.  It was closed in December 1938 and demolished in 1939, making way for the development of the area and the replacement of the low rises you see in this photo with majestic high rises that currently line the avenue.

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New York Central Railroad Train on Eleventh Avenue, 1929

New York Central Railroad Train on Eleventh Avenue, 1929

Before the West Side Improvement Project created the High Line, trains ran down Tenth and Eleventh Avenue. Here a New York Central Freight Train heads south on Eleventh. A flagman, or West Side Cowboy, should be preceding the train, but in this shot is out of the frame. The train is passing the George Kern building. Kern was a packing, wholesale, and retail distributor of pork and beef products, which was bought by Adolf Gobel, Inc., in 1927 for $10 million.

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Construction of Streetcar Tracks at Columbus Circle, 1897

Construction of Streetcar Tracks at Columbus Circle, 1897

In 1897, Columbus Circle was still the frontier. The monument to Columbus had been erected in 1892 to commemorate the four hundredth anniversary of Columbus's voyage, but construction of the circle was still underway until 1905. By 1920, in a traffic study commissioned by Special Deputy Commissioner in charge of Traffic, John A. Harriss, Columbus Circle was the business intersection in the world

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