Wall Street

Financial District Skyline from East River Pier, circa 1935

Financial District Skyline from East River Pier, circa 1935

In this black and white photo of the Lower Manhattan skyline, we can see the Financial District as it looked in the mid-1930s. In the center of the frame is 40 Wall Street, which was for most of May 1930 the tallest building in the world, losing its crown to the Chrysler Building.

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Broad Street and Exchange Place, circa 1920

Broad Street and Exchange Place, circa 1920

In this black and white photo, a messenger on the rooftop overlooks the curbmarket activity in Broad Street. This market handled stocks of companies too small to be listed on the New York Stock Exchange, and eventually grew up to be the American Stock Exchange. At the time of this photo, they were known at the New York Curb Market, and shortly after this photo was taken, they moved indoors to a site on Greenwich Street.

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Looking West from Wall and William Streets, 1907

Looking West from Wall and William Streets, 1907

Looking west from William Street, along Wall Street, toward Broadway, one sees Trinity Church. At the time of this photograph, 1907, the church was already 209 years old. Half-way between Trinity Church and the camera is Federal Hall. A statue of George Washington stands outside the building, commemorating his inauguration as First President of the United States on that site. At the time of this photograph, Federal Hall was the United State Sub-Treasury Building.

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Federal Hall on the corner of Wall and Broad Streets, 1915

Federal Hall on the corner of Wall and Broad Streets, 1915
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Wall and Broad Streets, 1916

Wall and Broad Streets, 1916

Ah, Wall Street. You can almost smell the money -- unless, like the gentleman in the extreme foreground, you have your finger jammed up your nose. On this day in 1916, the photographer captured the bustling activity of New York City's Financial District. Looking west along Wall, on the right you can see Federal Hall, which at the time was the United States Sub-Treasury building, on the left sit the newly-built House of Morgan and the New York Stock Exchange, and straight ahead, beyond Broadway is Trinity Church.

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Lower Manhattan Skyline looking North, 1930

Lower Manhattan Skyline looking North, 1930

A man in silhouette looks out from a high office in City Bank-Farmers' Trust Company Building toward 40 Wall Street, then known at the Bank of Manhattan Trust Building, which had only recently passed the Woolworth Building, visible further uptown, as the tallest building in the world. 40 Wall held that title for only a few weeks before being surpassed by the Chrysler Building, which can be seen through the window to the extreme right.

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Messengers inside the New York Stock Exchange, 1930

Messengers inside the New York Stock Exchange, 1930

Messengers at the end of the trading day on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange write down orders.  The floor surrounding station number four is littered with slips of paper.  Aside from the three young men working overtime, the cathedral of commerce looks entirely deserted. 

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Curb Market Activity, 1925

Curb Market Activity, 1925

This photo shows curb market activity on Broad Street in front of the New York Stock Exchange.  This sea of men and boys are relegated to the street to serve companies too small to be listed on the NYSE.  At the end of Broad Street is Federal Hall, which is today a museum.

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Curb Exchange, 1915

Curb Exchange, 1915

A boy in a window on Broad Street signals between a broker on the street and the office.  Curb exchanges catered to the needs of companies too small to be listed on the New York Stock Exchange.  Such alternative exchanges eventually grew up to be organizations like the AMEX and NASDAQ.

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Pretzel seller at Broadway and Beaver St, 1961

Pretzel seller at Broadway and Beaver St, 1961

The street vendor is a great New York City tradition.  Here, a couple of Wall Streeters grab a quick snack at lunch hour from a pretzel vendor at the corner of Broadway and Beaver St.

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