West Side

Seventh Avenue and West 31st Street, 1922

Seventh Avenue and West 31st Street, 1922

In this black and white photograph from 1922, we see Pennsylvania Station from the corner of 7th Avenue and W. 31st Street. Several cars and a street car are going past its columned facade. This monument to transportation, architected by the firm of McKim, Mead & White, would be torn down in 1963. At the time of this photo passenger volume had yet to reach its peak. The streets themselves look empty compared to today.

$35.00

Choose a print size

Sixth Avenue and West 52nd Street, 1937

Sixth Avenue and West 52nd Street, 1937

You're looking north from very near the center of the world, in 1937.  The Rockefeller Center complex, behind you on your right, was not entirely complete, although Radio City Music Hall had been open for about five years at the time this photo was taken.  The Sixth Avenue Elevated Line, overhead, would run for another year.  It was closed in December 1938 and demolished in 1939, making way for the development of the area and the replacement of the low rises you see in this photo with majestic high rises that currently line the avenue.

$35.00

Choose a print size

Pennsylvania Station, Prior to Opening, 1910

Pennsylvania Station, Prior to Opening, 1910

In 1910, the Pennsylvania Railroad Station, or Penn Station, opened to the public. The building, which was torn down in 1963 prompting the creation of New York City's Landmarks Preservation Commission, had been designed by the famed architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White in the Beaux-Arts style. The interior concourse, which you see in this black and white photograph taken just prior to the station's completion in 1910, was inspired by the Roman Baths of Caracalla.

$35.00

Choose a print size

The Old Met, c. 1885

The Old Met, c. 1885

The original Metropolitan Opera House occupied an entire city block between West 39th and 40th Streets along Broadway. It was built in 1883, and this photograph shows it not long after its opening, before the fire that gutted it in 1892. The building was demolished in 1967, and the Metropolitan Opera Company relocated to its present quarters in Lincoln Center.

$35.00

Choose a print size

Seventh Avenue and West 29th Street, 1915

Seventh Avenue and West 29th Street, 1915

Streetcars rumble down Seventh Avenue, past horse-drawn carts and seemingly all male pedestrians.  Looking a couple of blocks north, on the west side of the street, one can see the columns of the Pennsylvania Station, which opened in 1910. The buildings look like a mixture of street-level store fronts and upper story residences.

$35.00

Choose a print size

New York Central Railroad Train on Eleventh Avenue, 1929

New York Central Railroad Train on Eleventh Avenue, 1929

Before the West Side Improvement Project created the High Line, trains ran down Tenth and Eleventh Avenue. Here a New York Central Freight Train heads south on Eleventh. A flagman, or West Side Cowboy, should be preceding the train, but in this shot is out of the frame. The train is passing the George Kern building. Kern was a packing, wholesale, and retail distributor of pork and beef products, which was bought by Adolf Gobel, Inc., in 1927 for $10 million.

$35.00

Choose a print size

West Side Cowboy, circa 1930

West Side Cowboy, circa 1930

The West Side Cowboy was a common sight on Tenth Avenue for over 80 years. By law, a man on horseback, waving a red flag, had to precede each train that ran down the avenue. Still, so many accidents occurred that Tenth Avenue became known as Death Avenue. In 1929, the city, the state, and the New York Central Railroad agreed on the West Side Improvement Project, which resulted in the creation of the High Line and the elimination of the street level tracks and the flagman on horseback. Here we see the flagman on Tenth Avenue and West 28th Street, alongside Chelsea Park.

$35.00

Choose a print size

Amsterdam Avenue and West 96th Street, 1919

Amsterdam Avenue and West 96th Street, 1919

By the dawn of the Jazz Age, the Upper West Side was already starting to take on its modern appearance. Twenty years before, buildings would have been sparse, but by the time this photo was taken in 1919, apartment buildings had sprouted along the avenue as far as the eye could see. However, they still had much growing to do; St. Michael's Episcopal Church, on West 99th Street, towers above the "seedling" dwellings of the UWS of this era.

$35.00

Choose a print size

World Trade Center Under Construction, June 27, 1969

World Trade Center Under Construction, June 27, 1969

This black and white photograph, taken on June 27, 1969, by photographer Mal Gurian, shows the construction of the Twin Towers. In this shot, we look north past the WTC 2, or the South Tower, which is in the beginning stages of construction, toward WTC 1, the North Tower, which is well under way. Beyond the cranes of Koch Steel are the West Side Piers, absent of any hint of the World Financial Center.

$35.00

Choose a print size

Gansevoort Street and 11th Avenue, 1930

Gansevoort Street and 11th Avenue, 1930

In this black and white photograph, taken on March 21, 1930, we look north at the Gansevoort Market, the West Side Piers, and the beginning of the construction of the West Side Highway. The photographer was probably grateful it was March, since the smell of the slaughterhouses in summer could be overwhelming. If you look to the right, below the Lamb and Mutton sign, you can see the row of sheep carcasses hanging.

$35.00

Choose a print size

Syndicate content