Aerial Overview of Ebbets Field, 1933

Aerial Overview of Ebbets Field, 1933

Ebbets Field was the home of the Brooklyn Dodgers from 1913 until the Dodgers moved to Los Angeles following the 1957 season. Here we can see the stadium along with Prospect Park to the west and much of the Flatbush neighborhood, which Dem Bums called home.

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Bloomingdales in the Snow, 1935

Bloomingdales in the Snow, 1935

A snow storm never shuts down New York City, even in 1935. Here we see the 59th Street Crosstown Streetcar roll past Bloomingdales flagship store, which had opened only a few years before. There's still a horse-drawn vehicle even at this late date. The horse probably handled snow better than cars of the era.

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Queensboro Bridge from Second Avenue, 1914

Queensboro Bridge from Second Avenue, 1914

Pedestrians and some horse-drawn vehicles can be seen crossing the 59th Street Bridge from Second Avenue in Manhattan. The pedestrians seem to outnumber the vehicular traffic, although both are light by today's standards. The buildings to the south of the bridge are painted with a variety of advertisements, including for Coca-Cola, Wallach's Superior Laundry, Omega Oil for Sore Muscles, Puffed Rice, and Castoria.

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Workman Erecting Steel on the Queensboro Bridge, 1907

Workman Erecting Steel on the Queensboro Bridge, 1907

A workman on the Queensboro Bridge plies his trade high above the East River in 1907. The view is northwest from Blackwell's Island, which was later renamed Roosevelt Island, toward Manhattan. In the background, on Manhattan Island, are the warehouses of the American Malting Company, which was forced to reorganize in 1906 as the American Malting Corporation.

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Queensboro Bridge Under Construction, 1907

Queensboro Bridge Under Construction, 1907

Looking east from Manhattan toward Blackwell's Island on March 8, 1907, you would have seen the partially completed Queensboro Bridge. Originally called the Blackwell's Island Bridge, the Queensboro was completed and opened to the public in 1909, about two years after this photo was taken. At the time it opened, it was the longest cantilever bridge in North America.

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Original Washington Square Arch, 1890

Original Washington Square Arch, 1890
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Washington Square Arch, 1905

Washington Square Arch, 1905

The Washington Square Arch was erected to commemorate the centennial of George Washington's inauguration. This is not that arch. This arch was erected in 1892 to replace the temporary plaster and wooden structure which spanned Fifth Avenue just north of the park. In this photo, we are looking at the north face of the permanent marble arch designed by Stanford White. Absent are the two statues of George Washington, which were added in 1918.

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Performing the Rite of Tashlikh on the Williamsburg Bridge, 1910

Performing the Rite of Tashlikh on the Williamsburg Bridge, 1910

Every year for hundreds of years on Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year, Jews perform the Rite of Tashlikh, casting crumbs of bread, symbolic of their sins, into a flowing body of water. Here, in 1910, a group of women and girls cast their sins off from the Williamsburg Bridge into the East River. Jews in New York City still perform Tashlikh on the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges.

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Messengers inside the New York Stock Exchange, 1930

Messengers inside the New York Stock Exchange, 1930

Messengers at the end of the trading day on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange write down orders.  The floor surrounding station number four is littered with slips of paper.  Aside from the three young men working overtime, the cathedral of commerce looks entirely deserted. 

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Times Square VE Day Celebration, 1945

Times Square VE Day Celebration, 1945

On May 8, 1945, the ticker tape came down on the throng flooding Times Square. The war had ended in Europe. A scale model of the Statue of Liberty was on site to oversee the proceedings. With brown-outs over now, Times Square will once again become the Great White Way, and the actual Statue of Liberty will be lit for the first time since the beginning of the war.

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