Lower Manhattan, Lower East Side, Greenwich Village, Upper West Side, Upper East Side, Midtown East, Midtown West, Flatiron District and Madison Square, Iconic Buildings, People and Professions, Transportation, Harbor, Brooklyn, Queens, Baseball, Bridges, Statue of Liberty, The Bronx, Construction, Central Park, Manhattan Above 124th Street, Chelsea, World Trade Center

Lower Manhattan Skyline through Brooklyn Bridge Cables, 1923

Lower Manhattan Skyline through Brooklyn Bridge Cables, 1923

This view of the Lower Manhattan Skyline from the walkway of the Brooklyn Bridge is enhanced by the geometrics of the steel support cables and lattice.  The cables themselves were, in part, made from inferior wire that a subcontractor snuck into the project.  Rather than remove them, Chief Engineer Roebling let them stay, reasoning that the bridge would now be only four times stronger than it needed to be rather than six.

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Lower Manhattan Skyline Viewed from the Brooklyn Bridge, 1914

Lower Manhattan Skyline Viewed from the Brooklyn Bridge, 1914

Pedestrians stroll across the Brooklyn Bridge toward the Park Row Terminal, flanked by an Manhattan-bound train on their right.  Beyond the train, City Hall looms in the background, and to the far left the Woolworth Building juts at the sky.  Streetcars as well as the BMT rail line ran over the Brooklyn Bridge until around the middle of the last century.

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Brooklyn Bridge, 1905

Brooklyn Bridge, 1905

The camera points west toward the Brooklyn Bridge and Lower Manhattan as a ferry boat crosses beneath.  The bridge itself was inspired by a ferry crossing in the winter of 1852 during which engineer John Roebling was stranded for hours by ice pack.  He decided then, there needed to be a bridge built, and by 1870 his dream was under construction.

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Brooklyn Bridge Under Construction, 1877

Brooklyn Bridge Under Construction, 1877

The Brooklyn Bridge is probably the most famous bridge in the United States, rivaled only by the Golden Gate.  Here we see it in 1877, seven years into its construction.  Visitors stand on a catwalk above the Brooklyn side, while the camera points west toward Manhattan.  When it opened in 1883, it would link two of the nations largest cities, paving the way for the creation of the City of Greater New York.

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Macy's Department Store, 1908

Macy's Department Store, 1908

This is a northwest view of the Macy's department store at West 34th Street and Broadway.  Macy's open their flagship store at this Herald Square location in 1902, although the company had been operating for fifty years at the time of this photo.  The smaller building on the corner pre-existed the Macy's building.  It still exists today and currently sports the Macy's sign.

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Flatiron Building, 1902

Flatiron Building, 1902

A view south towards the Flatiron Building at the intersection of Fifth Avenue, Broadway, and 23rd Street.  This portrait was taken shortly after the completion of the building, at which time it was one of the tallest buildings in New York City.  The strong winds along with the downdrafts created by the building often caused women's skirts to be blown up.  The phrase, "23 Skidoo" purportedly comes from what policemen would shout at the men who loitered in the area awaiting the show.

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Construction of the Times Tower, 1904

Construction of the Times Tower, 1904

A view south at Broadway and West 44th Street toward the construction of the Times Tower.  At the time of its construction it was the second tallest skyscraper in New York City.  When its new headquarters opened on January 1, 1905, the New York Times celebrated with a fireworks display at midnight.  The tradition of celebrating the New Year in Times Square continues to this day.

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Fish Balloon in the Thanksgiving Day Parade, c. 1930

Fish Balloon in the Thanksgiving Day Parade, c. 1930

A rather voracious looking fish, controlled by clowns and men in "Middle Eastern" garb, floats down Broadway past the cigar store at West 110th Street.  A donkey-like balloon follows.  

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Thanksgiving Day Parade at W. 110th St., c. 1930

Thanksgiving Day Parade at W. 110th St., c. 1930

A horse-drawn parade float heads down Broadway as part of the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.  Here we see them passing West 110th Street.  A substantial crowd, including a number of boys in short pants, watches from the side-lines.

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Mr. Chicken in the Thanksgiving Day Parade, c. 1930

Mr. Chicken in the Thanksgiving Day Parade, c. 1930

Mr. Chicken parades down Broadway in Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.  Seen here, Mr. Chicken and his followers are passing West 110th Street (Cathedral Parkway).  The route used to follow Broadway from 145th Street to Herald Square, but in 2009 the route was altered to eliminate Broadway altogether.

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