Lower Manhattan, Lower East Side, Greenwich Village, Upper West Side, Upper East Side, Midtown East, Midtown West, Flatiron District and Madison Square, Iconic Buildings, People and Professions, Transportation, Harbor, Brooklyn, Queens, Baseball, Bridges, Statue of Liberty, The Bronx, Construction, Central Park, Manhattan Above 124th Street, Chelsea, World Trade Center

The Ritter Painless Dental Company, 1905

Ritter the Painless Dentist, 1905

View of the Ritter Dental building at Third Avenue and Schermerhorn Street, Brooklyn, 1905.  The Ritter Painless Dental Company specialized in cut-rate dental care.  The "It Didn't Hurt A Bit" Kid on the billboard outside was an early pre-cursor to Alfred E. Neuman, the face of MAD Magazine.  And for those whose literary tastes are a bit more serious, take a look on the right past the Dental Building to the optometrist's office across the street.  Anyone reminded of The Great Gatsby?

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Bombers Over Manhattan, 1940

Bombers Over Manhattan, 1940

View of northeast of the Lower Manhattan Skyline in 1940 as B-17 Bombers fly over the city.  Developed by Boeing in the late 1930s, the B-17 Flying Fortress was a strategic weapon for the Allies in World War II.  A high-flying four-engine heavy bomber, the B-17 dropped more bombs than any other U.S. aircraft during World War II.  Over 12,000 were manufactured before production ceased in 1945.  The Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges can be seen in the background along with some Lower Manhattan skyscrapers.

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East 42nd Street and Second Avenue, 1915

East 42nd Street and Second Avenue, 1915

View east toward entrance to the Second Avenue El.  Note the Tammany Hall poster above the entrance to the stairway, which places the date of this photo around October.  The platform for this elevated train station can be seen in this 1902 photo.

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Woman Dentist, 1909

Woman Dentist, 1909

The pioneer woman dentist, Dr. Rankin, gets ready to perform an extraction.  The patient looks relaxed, but there's no sign of anesthesia.  If he's lucky, she's given him a shot of novocaine, which had recently been invented.  If not, she might have injected him with cocaine, which had been in use as a local anesthetic since the 1880s.

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Workers atop Grand Central Terminal, 1950

Workers atop Grand Central Terminal, 1950

View east toward workers painting the flagpole on Grand Central Terminal.  The collossal clock and statue of "Transportation" by French artist Jules-Alexis Coutan are in the background. On the statue Mercury is flanked by Minerva and Hercules. Minerva, the goddess of wisdom, represents the thought and planning put into this building, while Mercury, the god of speed, represents both the speed of commerce and, of course, the speed of trains, and Hercules represents the strength of the men who built GCT.  The flagpole has since been removed.

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Chrysler Building at Dusk, 1950

Chrysler Building at Dusk, 1950

View southeast toward the Chrysler Building on East 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue.  A flourescent lancet crown tops this Manhattan landmark, which opened in 1931.  Designed by architect William Van Alen, this Art Deco masterpiece was the tallest building in the world for eleven months, before being surpassed by the Empire State Building.  In this photo, its majesty is unrivaled.

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Chrysler and Lincoln Buildings, 1930

Chrysler and Lincoln Buildings, 1930

View northwest toward the Chrysler and Lincoln Buildings both completed in 1930.  While the Chrysler Building towers over the Lincoln and is the pinnacle of Art Deco style, the Lincoln Building is not without its own merits.  Built in the neo-gothic style, the Lincoln Building sports gothic windows at the top and a bronze model of Abraham Lincoln by Daniel Chester French in it's lobby.  The statue was removed in 2009 when the building was renamed to One Grand Central Plaza.

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Empire State Building, 1932

Portrait of the Empire State Building, 1932

View northeast toward the newly completed Empire State Building, with the Chrysler building in the background, 1932.  Built in 410 days, the Empire State Building surpassed the Chrysler Building as the World's Tallest Building, a title the Chrysler only held for 11 months.  The Empire State Building held that title for over forty years.  In this photo it clearly dwarfs everything else in the midtown skyline.

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Flatiron Building Under Construction, 1902

Flatiron Building Under Construction, 1902

View south toward Fifth Avenue and E. 23rd Street, with a portrait of the Flatiron Building under construction, 1902.  Completed that same year, the Flatiron -- also known as the Fuller Building, after George A. Fuller, whose company constructed it -- was one of the tallest buildings in New York City.  Today it remains an immediately recognizable icon of New York.

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Chrysler Building and Traffic Statue, 1932

Chrysler Building and Traffic Statue, 1932
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