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Cherry Street and Rutgers Slip, c. 1890

Cherry Street and Rutgers Slip, c. 1890

A group of children play on a cart on Cherry Street in Lower Manhattan in the late 1800s. Children have a wonderful way of making fun where they find it and children of yesterday were no exception. It is a beautiful day in the city, and these children are forgoing one of the city's many playgrounds to make the most of this unattended cart.

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Fifth Avenue and East 65th Street, c. 1902

Fifth Avenue and East 65th Street, 1902

Looking North along Fifth Avenue from just south of East 65th Street, we see two horse carts pass in front of 840 Fifth Avenue, the Astor Mansion.  Designed in 1893 by architect Richard Morris Hunt to be the twin residences of John Jacob Astor and his family and his mother, Caroline Astor. After the elder Mrs. Astor died in 1907, John Jacob had the house renovated into single residence, making it one of the largest mansions in Gilded Age New York.

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Queen Elizabeth docking in New York, 1956

Queen Elizabeth docking in New York, 1956

In this photo, we see the RMS Queen Elizabeth docking in New York Harbor in 1956.  The Queen Elizabeth was an luxury ocean liner operated by the Cunard Line. Her career ran from her launch on September 27, 1938 until her retirement in 1969, when she was replaced by the Queen Elizabeth II.

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Women Workers in Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, c. 1944

Women Workers in Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, c. 1944

Women freight-handlers at the docks of the Bush Terminal, Brooklyn. During World War II, male laborers places at the Brooklyn wharves were being filled by women. Here, instead of Rosie the Riveter, we have the "Longshoregirls." 

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The Dakota Apartments, 1903

The Dakota Apartments, 1903

The Dakota Apartments at Central Park West and West 72nd Street is probably one of the most iconic buildings in New York City. Often remembered nowadays as the location of the murder of John Lennon by Mark David Chapman on December 8, 1980, the Dakota's place in New York history and in popular culture arises from more than that single tragic event. Aside from Lennon and his wife, Yoko Ono, the building's residents over the years have included many well-known New Yorkers, such as Lauren Bacall, Jason Robards, Jose Ferrer, Lillian Gish, Judy Garland, and Gilda Radner -- among others.

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New York Hospital and the East River, 1935

New York Hospital and the East River, 1935

This black and white photo, taken on May 19, 1935 from what was then Welfare Island, shows the East River and New York Hospital. Since then, both the island and the hospital have been renamed. Welfare Island was renamed Roosevelt Island after Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1973, and New York Hospital was renamed New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center in 1998 after merging with Columbia Presbyterian and receiving a substantial endowment from Sanford Weill. The East River retains its name.

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Ice Cream Seller Outside Jewish Daily News, c. 1895

Ice Cream Seller Outside Jewish Daily News, c. 1895

In this very grainy photo from before the turn of the Twentieth Century, we see a man selling ice cream outside of 185 East Broadway, the offices of the Jewish Daily News or Yiddishe Tageblatt. At the time of this photograph the Jewish Daily News had a circulation of 13,400, and published in both Yiddish and English. It was one of many Jewish newspapers published in New York City at this time. Across the street from the ice cream vendor, out of the frame of the photo, was a condemned property belonging to the Ludlow Street Jail.

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Queensboro Bridge Construction Seen from Ravenswood, late 1907

Queensboro Bridge Construction Seen from Ravenswood, late 1907

Ravenswood, Queens, started as a tony hamlet in the middle of the 19th Century, but by the time of this photograph it had been absorbed into Long Island City. In this photograph, looking west, one can see the ongoing construction of the Queensboro Bridge. It looks as if the Blackwell's Island span was complete and what remains is to connect to the spans on Manhattan and Long Island. The bridge, originally named the Blackwell's Island Bridge, would open to the public on June 12, 1909, not too long after this photo was taken.

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Aerial View of Lower Manhattan, c. 1930

Aerial View of Lower Manhattan, c. 1930

In this eastern-looking aerial photograph of Lower Manhattan and Tribeca, taken around 1930, one gets a view of many of the most notable structures of the day, including the Woolworth Building, the Municipal Building, City Hall and the Post Office, as well as the Federal Courthouse, and the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges. Aside from the Woolworth and Municipal Buildings nothing in view could be called a skyscraper. It's is a very different Lower Manhattan Skyline than today's.

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Madison Square Garden, 1924

Madison Square Garden, 1924

The second Madison Square Garden, seen here decorated for the 1924 Democratic National Convention, was located at East 26th Street and Madison Avenue, where the New York Life Building stands today. This incarnation of the Garden replaced a more primitive open-air arena. Designed by the famed architect Stanford White in 1890, it was also the site of his 1906 murder by socialite Harry K. Thaw over White's affair with Thaw's wife, the actress Evelyn Nesbit. The building was designed in the Beaux-Arts style and boasted a roof garden restaurant.

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